Borden is a fan of all types of glute bridges for activating your glutes, especially when you're on the road. "Traveling means sitting a lot," she says. "When we sit a lot, our hamstrings [and] hip flexors all shorten and tighten up." Over time, this can make it challenging for your glutes to engage the way they're supposed to, in the gym and in day-to-day life (this is also known as dead butt syndrome). Incorporating glute bridges in your routine can help combat this.

Even very vigorous exercise—like the interval workouts Gibala is studying—can, in fact, be appropriate for people with different chronic conditions, from Type 2 diabetes to heart failure. That’s new thinking, because for decades, people with certain diseases were advised not to exercise. Now scientists know that far more people can and should exercise. A recent analysis of more than 300 clinical trials discovered that for people recovering from a stroke, exercise was even more effective at helping them rehabilitate.

Some call it “flab”, others call it “sag”, or even “jiggle.” Whatever it is that you call the excess fat on your arms, know that you’re not alone. A lot of us have found ourselves in the dilemma, wondering how to lose arm fat and why it’s even there in the first place. Is it something I ate? Is it something I did or didn’t do? What shirt can I wear to hide to cover those parts?


The benefits of exercise diminish within weeks after a person stops exercising. Heart strength, muscle strength, and the level of HDL cholesterol decrease, whereas blood pressure and body fat increase. Even former athletes who stop exercising do not retain measurable long-term benefits. However, people who were physically active in the past often can regain fitness faster.
Start by placing a chair on a sturdy surface against a wall with the seat facing towards you. You can also do tricep dips on the edge of a staircase (such as the 2nd or 3rd step from the bottom) or a workout bench. Stand 1 to 2 feet (0.30 to 0.61 m) in front of the edge of the seat of the chair. Place your hands behind you, shoulder width apart with your fingers gripping the edge of the chair. Bend your knees so they are at a 90-degree angle and your knees are directly above your ankles. 

Jessica Matthews, M.S., E-RYT500 is faculty in kinesiology and integrative wellness at Point Loma Nazarene University and professor of yoga studies at MiraCosta College, where she helps to grow and mentor the next generation of health and wellness professionals. A dynamic speaker, respected educator, fitness industry veteran and featured wellness expert, Jessica is a trusted and recognized go-to media resource, regularly contributing to numerous publications and outlines on topics ranging from fitness and yoga, to health coaching and career development. Additionally, she serves as ACE’s senior advisor for health and fitness education, and is the lead editor and author of the ACE Group Fitness Instructor Handbook: The Professional’s Guide to Creating Memorable Movement Experiences. You can connect with her at www.jessica-matthews.com, @fitexpertjess (Twitter and Instagram) and www.facebook.com/fitexpertjess.

A certain level of muscle strength is needed to function every day and do things such as walking and climbing stairs. Strengthening exercises increase this muscle strength by putting more strain on a muscle than it is normally accustomed to receiving. This increased load stimulates the growth of proteins inside each muscle cell that allow the muscle as a whole to contract.
What you can do is remove body fat from your entire body. Basically, you have to decrease your overall body fat composition if you want to lose weight from any specific place on your body. When you do that, you are going to eventually target the part of your body you want and you're going to lose body fat there. You can't just do 1000 push-ups every day and lose arm fat. Instead, you have to lose body fat in your entire body while building those arm muscles. You build up those muscles so that when your body fat percentage is low enough, they can show through.
Another study this month, from Mayo Clinic, found that exercise in older people who were formerly sedentary had at least as strong an impact as in it did in young people—at least in the kinds of genes that were expressed. The study also found that these changes were much more robust in response to interval training than to weight lifting or moderate exercise. Which may mean that for some things, the type of exercise we chose matters.
Inflammation (in-fluh-mey-shun): The redness and warmth around a cut or scrape is short-term inflammation, produced by the immune system to aid healing. But another type called chronic inflammation, triggered by compounds from abdominal fat, gum disease and other factors, lingers in the body. Research suggests this type increases the risk for heart disease, diabetes, dementia and some forms of cancer.
HOW TO DO IT: Start in a high plank with your hands underneath your shoulders. Jump your feet outside your hands and drop into a deep squat position, pushing your knees out and keeping your feels flat on the floor while prying your chest open with your hands. Return to the starting position and repeat. For an added challenge, try moving both forward and backward.
Lifestyle factors have a huge impact on certain conditions – and diabetes is one of them. Exercise can help to reduce your insulin requirements, lower your cholesterol levels and high blood pressure, and in the long term can reduce the development of heart disease and stroke. This is important because diabetics have a higher risk of developing heart and circulatory problems. Exercise can also promote weight loss, improve circulation and reduce stress levels (raising your glucose level).
In a widely-cited study published in February 2013 in the American Journal of Health Promotion, researchers at Oregon State University looked at more than 6,000 American adults and found that even small amounts of physical activity — like pacing while talking on the phone or doing some jumping jacks during commercials while watching TV, as long as these short bursts of exercise add up to 30 minutes a day — can be just as beneficial as longer workout sessions at the gym.
For the greatest overall health benefits, experts recommend that you do 20 to 30 minutes of aerobic activity three or more times a week and some type of muscle strengthening activity and stretching at least twice a week. However, if you are unable to do this level of activity, you can gain substantial health benefits by accumulating 30 minutes or more of moderate-intensity physical activity a day, at least five times a week.
Getting your workout in can also improve your sleep. In one study of 2,600 subjects, people who exercised at least 150 minutes a week reported a 65 percent improvement in sleep quality as well as better energy levels during the day, according to the National Sleep Foundation. And there's nothing more heavenly than a solid night of sleep (and nothing more rewarding after a tough workout during the day).
You’ve recently tried on a strapless dress and noticed that your arms are looking soft and flabby. Having excess fat on your arms can cause self-consciousness about showing off your upper body. You aren’t doomed to a lifetime of long-sleeved shirts. It is not possible to target one area of your body for fat loss, but decreasing your total body fat percentage will give your arms a slimmer appearance. You can quickly trim inches off your arms with diet and exercise.
Whether we’re fully conscious of it or not, we’re always looking for how to be happy. And exercise is one of the most obvious steps to take, as it’s not a coincidence that you feel better after a good workout: It’s science. A Penn State University study found that people who exercised, whether it was a mild, moderate or vigorous workout, had more pleasant feelings than those who didn’t. (1)
Endorphins are hormones in the brain associated with a happy, positive feeling. A low level of endorphins is associated with depression. During exercise, plasma levels of this substance increase. This may help to ease symptoms of depression. A recent National Health and Nutrition survey found that physically active people were half as likely to be depressed.
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