No matter what your age or shape, you should exercise daily. Not only does exercise tone your body so you can wear your favorite jeans, it strengthens your muscles, keeps your bones strong, and improves your skin. And there are more benefits of exercise -- increased relaxation, better sleep and mood, strong immune function, and more. Let's look at some of the incredible benefits of exercise then talk about how you can get started.
HOW TO DO IT: Stand with your feet together and hold both arms straight in front of you, palms together. Jump your feet apart, push your hips back, bend your knees and lower into a squat while pulling your arms apart and squeezing your shoulder blades together. Shift your weight over your right leg, and then your left leg, then right and left again before returning back to center and standing back up. Gradually increase your speed and range of motion throughout the set.
Here's some quick physics fun: A body at rest tends to stay at rest. That's the fitness version of Newton's First Law, and it means that humans will find literally any excuse to not work out. I don't have time.... I felt a slight ache in my knee and don't want to make that worse... It's high tide. Somewhere. Probably. This happens to everyone—even the most dedicated, ruthless, disciplined gym-goers among us. (Like we said, it's science)
You can choose to do them on your knees or on your toes, as well as a wide variety of push up variations to target specific muscle groups in the arm. Place your arms closer to your body or farther out to lose fat in a specific area. If you’re really serious about losing arm fat, drop down and do a set of push ups whenever you have time. In the office, on lunch or while you’re catching up on the news, a set here and there can help you get rid of arm fat and transform arm muscles.

From fortifying your immune system against future cancers to reducing the risk of breast cancer, regular exercise helps protect your body. (12) Although researchers aren’t entirely sure how exercise boosts immunity, theories range from bacteria being flushed out of the body to a reduction in stress-released hormones that might increase the risk of illness. (13)


Complete sit-up pullovers. Sit-up pullovers will work your triceps and abs and help you burn fat. Hold a weight in each hand and lie on an exercise mat with your arms extended directly above you. With your knees bent and your feet flat, slowly curl your body up to lift your head, shoulders, and back off the ground. Keep your arms up and move them in a smooth arc-like motion towards your knees. Hold this position for one second, then lower yourself back down. Do 2-3 sets of 10-15 reps.[4]
Stand whit your feet placed hip width apart and arms raised straight to the sides, raised at shoulder height and the fingers together. Begin by keeping your palms facing towards the floor and then slowly rotate your thumbs towards the back until the palms are facing the ceiling. Slowly rotate the thumb down and forward. Repeat it 30 times at a stretch for best results.
It brings on better sleep. If you're having sleep problems, skip the pills and hit the pool, track or spin studio. According to one study, people who exercised regularly for about 10 weeks reported sleeping better than they had previously. What exactly does “better” mean? In this case, it translated to dozing off faster and having a decreased need for sleep-promoting medication.
From fortifying your immune system against future cancers to reducing the risk of breast cancer, regular exercise helps protect your body. (12) Although researchers aren’t entirely sure how exercise boosts immunity, theories range from bacteria being flushed out of the body to a reduction in stress-released hormones that might increase the risk of illness. (13)
A study published in October 2017 in the American Journal of Psychiatry suggested that even just one hour of exercise of any intensity each week can help prevent depression. The study monitored levels of exercise and symptoms of depression and anxiety in 33,908 adults over 11 years and found that even small amounts of physical activity had a protective effect against depression, regardless of the person’s age or gender.
This may be the most worthwhile reason for exercising there is. Studies have shown how people who exercise are at a significantly reduced risk of developing dementia like Alzheimer’s disease. And even for people who start exercising relatively late in life, brain volume can actually increase over time, as can scores on memory tests, compared to people who don’t exercise (their brains shrunk over time, which is normal part of aging).
The workout below, created by Jess Sims, NASM-certified personal trainer and instructor at Classpass Live, Shadowbox, and Fhitting Room in New York City, challenges your entire body and doesn't require a single piece of equipment. "It’s a full-body, dynamic workout that includes strength, power, mobility, and cardio," Sims says. "It’s also great because it’s customizable—if you have less than 20 minutes, you can do the circuit one time, or if you have more than 20 minutes you can do it three times."
Get down on all fours with your knees placed directly below your hips and palms placed directly below your shoulders. Now, raise your right arm forward and stretch your left leg backward at the same time. Create a tension in your back by flexing your foot. Hold the position for a few seconds and then come back to the starting position. Repeat the same using your left arm and right leg. Repeat 15 to 20 times on both sides.
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